Tools and Shop Talk - Opinions, Thoughts, Reviews, B.S., etc.

Stairgod

Two bad decisions away from buying a bulldozer
Joined
Apr 22, 2019
Messages
2,454
Precision holes are seldom a real world thing. Placement is typically way more important than actual diameter. Even threaded holes can be off a tad unless the threads need to be 100% fully formed.
And when precise sized holes are needed they typically aren't drilled to final size anyway but reamed.
At least with a mill you can power tap, and once you do that you will never want to hand tap again.
Welcome to your newest rabbit hole buddy!
 

Chris In Milwaukee

Ain’t no mo’
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Messages
3,120
Age
56
Location
North Woods, WI USA
Precision holes are seldom a real world thing. Placement is typically way more important than actual diameter. Even threaded holes can be off a tad unless the threads need to be 100% fully formed.
And when precise sized holes are needed they typically aren't drilled to final size anyway but reamed.
At least with a mill you can power tap, and once you do that you will never want to hand tap again.
Welcome to your newest rabbit hole buddy!
OMG, no kidding! I’ve been in a 2-3 week YT bender watching machining stuff. I’ve always like This Old Tony for the longest time. His humor jives with mine. But damn, there’s so much to see (and buy!)
 

Arcticelf

Head BFH Operator at Gray Man Fab
Joined
Apr 23, 2019
Messages
1,168
Location
DelCo PA
Precision holes are seldom a real world thing. Placement is typically way more important than actual diameter. Even threaded holes can be off a tad unless the threads need to be 100% fully formed.
And when precise sized holes are needed they typically aren't drilled to final size anyway but reamed.
At least with a mill you can power tap, and once you do that you will never want to hand tap again.
Welcome to your newest rabbit hole buddy!
God I miss having a big bed lathe.
 

Slim-Whitey

Canadian hoser, Eh?
Know it all snowfake
Joined
Mar 8, 2019
Messages
4,153
Age
32
Location
Saskatchewan
I've never heard of those, or at least I don't remember it if I have. They seem a little gimmicky to me. Their website is. . . Ancient. . . And apparently this process involves hot gluing blocks to an RO, and routering them off?

If they work, well. . .
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Slim-Whitey

Canadian hoser, Eh?
Know it all snowfake
Joined
Mar 8, 2019
Messages
4,153
Age
32
Location
Saskatchewan
Nope.
Can't do it.

Can't watch 20 minutes of a guy explaining a "7 minute process" just to get his video length longer for monetization.

Tool looks alright enough. It'd be interesting the first few times and then looks to be a quick bit of work.

Might skip the hot glue and use something else just because though.
 

Stairgod

Two bad decisions away from buying a bulldozer
Joined
Apr 22, 2019
Messages
2,454
Nope.
Can't do it.

Can't watch 20 minutes of a guy explaining a "7 minute process" just to get his video length longer for monetization.

Tool looks alright enough. It'd be interesting the first few times and then looks to be a quick bit of work.

Might skip the hot glue and use something else just because though.
I will let you know how it goes once I start using it.
I have 60 doors to set on this job.
I can hang a door in about 30 minutes. Looking to half that with this jig.
I am not concerned with the hot glue on the shims.
They will end up nailed off once the door is installed so now worries about them coming loose.
I am not really a fan of Spencer Lewis. I have quite a few issues with the way he does things.
I guess time will tell if this will save me money or not.
But I do have a younger guy that can set it up and router all the shims leaving me free to just set the doors. May be a win/win.
 

Slim-Whitey

Canadian hoser, Eh?
Know it all snowfake
Joined
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Messages
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Age
32
Location
Saskatchewan
Only reason the hot glue annoys me is because of all the Pinterest shit I see put together with fucking hot glue. It's a completely pointless peeve and nothing more.

On a house full of doors, I get it, I think.

If you like it, I might snag one when Moses finds the promised land and the insurance rebuild goes through for me. About 16 doors in that place. Could be a time saver.
But I'm not crossing my fingers on that. Or anything at this stage.
Got word that condo framing could be *next spring*.

I digress . . .The routing gets me. What a mess, just to hang a door. Keep a guy busy behind you just cleaning up.
 
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Chris In Milwaukee

Ain’t no mo’
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
Messages
3,120
Age
56
Location
North Woods, WI USA
Nope.
Can't do it.

Can't watch 20 minutes of a guy explaining a "7 minute process" just to get his video length longer for monetization.

Tool looks alright enough. It'd be interesting the first few times and then looks to be a quick bit of work.

Might skip the hot glue and use something else just because though.
We should duly judge your posts here similarly then ;):boink::beerscheers:
 

Stairgod

Two bad decisions away from buying a bulldozer
Joined
Apr 22, 2019
Messages
2,454
Color me intrigued... Always cool to hear from life-long pros. Quite sure most ways are better than the way I do it. :anon:
Overall I like his approach. He has some very good ideas and techniques.
After watching his door setting video I noticed he pulls the hinge leaf off the jamb and install a deck screw underneath. Great idea but worthless. The top hinge takes most of the load. Top two on a 7 or 8' door. The screws holding the hinge to the jamb are short and aren't into very much wood. They tend to loosen up over time, and his method does nothing to hold the hinge tight.
I always get longer screws in a finish to match the hinges and pull one or two of the hinge screws and install the longer ones directly into the framing. The hinge cannot possible work loose over time. My technique has worked very well over the years and I have had the pleasure of setting some big heavy doors.
I have gone back and forth a few times whether or not to shim directly behind the hinge, or use the long screws as a future "adjustment" should things get whacky over time. Without shims directly behind the hinge I could then tweak the hinge location a smidge without really effecting the jamb/casing reveal much.
Fortunately I have not had to go back to jobs to tweak shit like that. I only visit my old clients for a cup of coffee or a beer on occasion.

I started to watch his vid on shop built stairs. I stopped it when he not he'd the nosings of the treads.... But honestly I don't watch any stair building vids at all. I have way too many opinions on the proper way to be able to sit through any of them, despite my admiration for the content creator.
Similarly I could hardly watch his curved trim video.
He does very well for a trim carpenter, but that is more millwright work and has a totally different skill set.

And ....
I started my own drinking game. Every time he called a liner(or jack, or trimmer) a cripple I took a shot. Passed out halfway through.
And don't get my started on his stain grain work.....with poplar....much less finger jointed poplar.
He is basically a tract home trimmer. Granted they are higher end tract homes, but still.
But he does quite well it seems, he is certainly quick, and his workmanship is technically sound. The mere fact that he clamps and glues his casing miters earns my respect.
 

Stairgod

Two bad decisions away from buying a bulldozer
Joined
Apr 22, 2019
Messages
2,454
AAAHHHAHA Y E S. :laugh::laugh:

@Stairgod what's your opinion of the "instant" epoxy glues for miters, like Miterbond?

I typically just. . Glue it. . . But I know some guys swear by the instant shit. Seems like a bad time waiting to happen to me. . .
All depends. Pre finished crown for cabinets? Yes.
Miter casing? Usually just Titebond 3 and miter clamps.
I have also used polyurethane hot melt in the past for certain things.
Iirc the gun was made by Steinel. Worked well but I certainly didn't use it for everything.
 

Slim-Whitey

Canadian hoser, Eh?
Know it all snowfake
Joined
Mar 8, 2019
Messages
4,153
Age
32
Location
Saskatchewan
Hm, alright. Anything MDF I use titebond and clamps as well.

I've got some people inquiring about cabinet installs and crown has come up. If they pull the trigger I'll get a couple of jigs to speed things up and crown miters are on my hitlist of "this needs to be made faster and easier than I've dealt with in the past". Was wondering is all.

Shop passed the electrical inspection yesterday (lulz, as if I haven't been using it for 2 months)

Think I might just start dismantling that tablesaw for arbour bearings. That'll be a job. . .
 

Stairgod

Two bad decisions away from buying a bulldozer
Joined
Apr 22, 2019
Messages
2,454
Hm, alright. Anything MDF I use titebond and clamps as well.

I've got some people inquiring about cabinet installs and crown has come up. If they pull the trigger I'll get a couple of jigs to speed things up and crown miters are on my hitlist of "this needs to be made faster and easier than I've dealt with in the past". Was wondering is all.

Shop passed the electrical inspection yesterday (lulz, as if I haven't been using it for 2 months)

Think I might just start dismantling that tablesaw for arbour bearings. That'll be a job. . .
Not the worst job. But can go south pretty quickly though
 

Slim-Whitey

Canadian hoser, Eh?
Know it all snowfake
Joined
Mar 8, 2019
Messages
4,153
Age
32
Location
Saskatchewan
Apparently, despite being one of the Taiwan assembled saws, this General model is a pain in the ass because of the way the trunnions attach. I have a manual for it, so that'll hopefully help.

The fence is showing its age a bit too. After some more billable work, a "funtime" purchase will be one of these.

Donating the little old delta to a friend. It's taking space in the shop, and switching dado blades if need be doesn't inconvenience me enough.
 
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